Capodimonte

Capodimonte is a style of the finest Italian porcelain which roots can be dated back to the mid-18th century.

 

King Charles of Bourbon & his wife Amalia of Saxony decided to found a centre for porcelain production within the grounds of their palace at Capodimonte.

 

The Royal Factory of Capodimonte was born and whose production was considered even greater than the French & German of the time.

 

Capodimonte produced some of the best soft-paste porcelain, most of which were modelled by sculptor Giuseppe Gricci who created the famous little porcelain living room for Queen Amalia, which is considered to be the most expressive use of the artistic style of Capodimonte.

 

The last two decades of the 18th-century saw the most flourishing period of the Royal Factory of Capodimonte when it was born a real art school led by Domenico Venuti whose wares are now on display at the Museum of Capodimonte.

 

The Royal Factory no longer produces the fine porcelain wares of Capodimonte but has now become one of the largest museums in Naples, preserving the most famous and valuable pieces.

 

The craftmanship of Capodimonte porcelain has never stopped and still continues to present day.

 

The Capodimonte figurines of the 20th-century commonly depict "raggedly dressed peasants of a comedic Walt Disney cartoon appearance"

 

In the gallery below you will find some of finest examples including large figural groups by artisans such as; Bruno Merli, Sandro Maggioni & Giuseppe Armani manufacturing their own wares under the Capodimonte name.

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